English — Year 9

 

English Overview

Term 1: Term 1 & 2: Romeo & Juliet – William Shakespeare.

Pupils will read sections of Romeo and Juliet to consolidate their skills in interpreting and analysing not only Shakespearean English, but also the crafting of a play. As well as exploring the rich language, students will also consider universal themes of love, death, loyalty and revenge. By further delving into Elizabethan society, students can deepen their understanding of how a work of art is rooted in the time, place and space in which it is created; considering which of the issues explored are still relevant today.

Analysis of an extract from a key scene.

Sonnet

A sonnet (pronounced son-it) is a fourteen line poem with a fixed rhyme scheme. Often, sonnets use iambic pentameter: five sets of unstressed syllables followed by stressed syllables for a ten-syllable line.

Prologue

A separate introductory section of a literary, dramatic, or musical work.

Hamartia

A hero or heroine's fatal flaw / weakness that will eventually destroy them.

Protagonist / antagonist

A protagonist is the main character in a story. An antagonist is their main enemy / rival. Romeo and Juliet are the eponymous (their names are in the title) protagonists, Tybalt is the antagonist.

Foreshadowing

Foreshadowing is a literary device in which a writer gives an advance hint of what is to come later in the story. Foreshadowing often appears at the beginning of a story, or a chapter, and it helps the reader develop expectations about the upcoming events.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural
Develop the individual:

Awareness of different cultures and the significance of past events.

Create a supportive community:

Term 2: Term 1 & 2: Writer’s craft: Language and structure & creative writing.

In term 1, students will work with their teachers on annotating a range of fictional and non-fictional extracts to identify the effects of Language and Structure within a text. Students will by this stage be increasing the sophistication of their analysis, tackling increasingly challenging texts, and really teasing out the nuances of the language used.

In term 2, students will be developing, planning and crafting imaginative writing, using a range of descriptive techniques and accurate spelling, punctuation and grammar. By now students are increasingly showcasing powerful mini-narratives, immersing their readers within credible - and often thought-provoking narratives. Moreover, students explore a range of different potential structures and narrative perspectives . Benefitting from explicit literacy teaching across KS3, students confidently craft sentencing and punctuation at sentence and whole text level for maximum impact.

1) Language and Structure analysis of a non-fiction text.

2) Creative Writing assessment based on a picture stimulus.

(Non) Chronological narrative

A chronological narrative is a story told in the order that events happened. A non-chronological narrative may start in "the present" before using a flashback to talk about events in the past.

Dual perspective narrative

A narrative (story) told from two different viewpoints e.g. a third person narrator and from a character's perspective.

Motif / extended metaphor

Motif is a literary technique that consists of a repeated element that has symbolic significance to a literary work. Sometimes, a motif is a recurring image. Other times, it's a repeated word, phrase, or topic expressed in language.

Tone

Formal or less formal? Serious or humorous? Factual or full of opinions? Balanced or biased?

Standalone paragraph

A one sentence paragraph - normally used for emphasis.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural
Develop the individual:

Create a supportive community:

Term 3 & 4: The Curious Incident of The Dog in The Night Time – Mark Haddon: Term 3 & 4: The Curious Incident of The Dog in The Night Time – Mark Haddon

Pupils will read this unique novel to build their critical reading and analytical skills, whilst also considering a wide range of structural techniques. Through their engagement with a truly unique protagonist students will consider a range of moral questions and societal issues, including societal attitudes to neurodivergency, the difficulties faced by families, and how the best intentions do not always lead to the best outcomes. These synoptic skills are vital for GCSE English literature papers 1 & 2, and are transferable to language content. However, equally importantly, through the atypical writing style, students can continue to engage with multifaceted characters, encouraging reflection on our own preconceptions and prejudices.

Analytic written response to the whole novel.

Atypical

Something that is different to others of the same type, group, or class.

Neurodivergent

A relatively new term, neurodivergent simply means someone who thinks differently from the way the majority (referred to as neurotypical) expect. Neurotypical means the opposite –someone whose brain behaves in the same way as the majority of society.

duality

When one person has two sides to their personality or character.

Protagonist

The leading character or one of the major characters in a play, film, novel.

Epistolary novel

An epistolary novel is a novel written as a series of documents. The usual form is letters, although diary entries, newspaper clippings and other documents are sometimes used. Recently, electronic "documents" such as recordings, blogs, and e-mai

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural
Develop the individual:

Create a supportive community:

Term 4: Term 3 & 4: Writer’s craft: Evaluation & transactional writing.

Students will work with their teachers on annotating a range of fiction and non-fiction extracts, for key ideas that the writer includes to successfully develop a theme, mood or argument. With a critical eye on different approaches, students draw together their knowledge of texts, genres and approaches to confidently evaluate how and why writers have chosen to present their work in these ways.

Also, pupils will develop understanding of how to write non-fiction text types such as letters, speeches, articles, reviews, and travel writing. Students increasingly consider their own purposes, audiences, generic conventions, and overall tone required by "real world" tasks. Drawing on their knowledge of features of different text types, students craft texts that range from the humorous to the powerful, showcasing their writing skills. All of this is underpinned by an explicit focus on utilising different vocabulary, sentence types, and punctuation to augment the power of their ideas.

1) Evaluation of a non-fiction text. 2) Transactional writing.

Motif / extended metaphor

Motif is a literary technique that consists of a repeated element that has symbolic significance to a literary work. Sometimes, a motif is a recurring image. Other times, it's a repeated word, phrase, or topic expressed in language.

Tone

Formal or less formal? Serious or humorous? Factual or full of opinions? Balanced or biased?

Credible / expert opinions

Including statements / quotations from experts or others, to make your writing / arguments seem more believable.

Standalone paragraph

A one sentence paragraph - normally used for emphasis.

Ironic / irony

Express something other than and especially the opposite of the literal meaning, usually for humorous effect / to emphasise an idea.

Inclusive pronouns

Using pronouns such as you / your, we / us / our to engage an audience.

Authorial intent

The aim that a writer is trying to achieve e.g. to persuade their audience to take a certain action, to point out a particular issue.

Overview

A brief summary of an idea, text or issue.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural
Develop the individual:

Create a supportive community:

Term 5 & 6: “Belonging” Anthology Poetry & Comparison skills: revision for end of year assessment.: Term 5 & 6: “Belonging” Anthology Poetry & Comparison skills: revision for end of year assessment.

Beginning the GCSE content by exploring a range of viewpoints from the new, diverse “Belonging” Anthology, students tackle some “big thoughts: to what extent do any of us belong to a certain place, time or society? How many different versions of any us co-exist at any one time? As well as further improving their comparative analytical skills by exploring the ways in which poets craft and structure their works, students will consider a range of viewpoints, experiences and scenarios. Key skills: Reading and interpreting poetry; analysing and comparing poetic forms, and how they are informed by wider context. To complement this, students will further develop their comparison skills by teasing out the nuances of writers’ craft across a range of non-fiction texts. They will be honing their abilities to interrogate exactly how and why writers are presenting a range of viewpoints and perspectives, and how these choices are supposed to influence us.

Comparative analytical essays.

End of Year Assessment is an English Language Paper 1: Reading fiction + Creative writing

Romanticism

A literary, artistic, and philosophical movement originating in the 18th century. Often focussed on autobiographical material, thoughts and feelings, common human values, and an appreciation of nature.

Literary allusion

Ideas, characters, imagery etc. referencing another famous book, poem, play etc.

Dual heritage

A person from two or more cultural or ethnic backgrounds.

Authorial voice

A character or narrator voicing an author or poet's own personal opinions.

Dramatic monologue

Writing a poem to tell a story from the perspecive or viewpoint of a specific character or historical figure.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural
Develop the individual:

Create a supportive community: